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Aaron Moore

February 11, 1918 – November 27, 2013

Aaron Moore is one of the survivors of the classic boogie-woogie piano style that permeated the 1950s Chicago blues scene. At age 87, he had just begun to gain the notoriety that eluded him throughout most of his career. Known primarily as a backing musician, Moore provided accompaniment for such greats as Little Walter, Muddy Waters, B.B. King, Hound Dog Taylor, Howlin’ Wolf, Honeyboy Edwards and Lonnie Brooks in a career that spans more than forty years.

Born and raised in Greenwood, Mississippi, Moore was encouraged in his piano playing by his mother, who was a music teacher and church piano player. Early influences included Curtis Jones and Memphis Slim, but much of his distinct sound comes from boogie-woogie legend Roosevelt Sykes, whom he learned from and frequently performed with upon moving to Chicago. Moore focused on his career and family, working for many years and retiring from a job with the City of Chicago, playing many local club dates on weekends from the 1950s through the 1980s.

After retiring, Aaron made playing his full-time interest.  Backing up local bluesman Brewer Phillips on his Delmark debut  gained for Moore the attention of producer Pete Nathan, who requested Aaron finally release his first solo album. His critically acclaimed debut, Hello World, and the subsequent Boot ‘Em Up (both on Chicago’s Delmark Records) solidified Moore’s place among the hierarchy of blues piano masters.

Aaron continued to tour the United States and abroad, playing both as a solo artist and backing other musicians like his good friend David “Honeyboy” Edwards. He also continued to support other musicians in the studio, and can be heard on Cleveland Fats’ 2006 release, The Way Things Go,  on Honeybee Records. While remaining a local hero, Aaron Moore is finally beginning to gain the recognition he so richly deserves.

“… an excellent presentation of classic piano blues [that] clearly reveals that the classic style is still alive and well in the hands of Moore.”

–Dave “Doc” Piltz (Blues on Stage)

Aaron moore blues pianist
Pianist